Advances in HD video are so fast that it can be somewhat dizzying. HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) just recently became part of the...

Advances in HD video are so fast that it can be somewhat dizzying. HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) just recently became part of the mainstream HD A / V movement, but a new signal has already cropped up and is posed to replace the original HDMI specification. HDMI 1.3 was released in the summer of 2006 but has finally begun to take the place of HDMI.

Before one goes out and spends the farm on new HDMI 1.3 appliances, it is probably critical to at least understand what the changes actually are, and if it's worth it. One of the biggest changes is the optional compliance to the new HD audio standards DTS HD and Dolby TrueHD. Original HDMI uses 7.1 surround sound audio for a slightly less real experience for true audio buffs. Another useful feature is automatic audio / video sync, which ensures that the audio and video match up. I have not had the problem yet where I felt like I needed this option.

Another feature which I like to perform a side-by-side analysis on is support of 30-bit, 36-bit, and 48-bit video with "Deep Color," essentially allowing for over billions of colors. The single link bandwidth is also increased to 10.2 Gbit / s on HDMI 1.3. Another feature that comes in handy for HD camcorder user is the availability of a mini-HDMI connector.

The main thing to keep in mind is that if you're going to get home theater equipment that is HDMI 1.3 compliant, you are not going to be able to use those old HDMI cables and switches from your old set up. If you have multiple HDMI 1.3 sources and need to feed those to your display, you're going to need to get an HDMI 1.3 compliant switch. Same with the cables. So the choice is yours. You'll have to weigh the costs and benefits to decide.



Source by Cameron Postelwait

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