There was a time in Europe where SCART equipment was extremely common. This was a standard that was used to connect items such as...

There was a time in Europe where SCART equipment was extremely common. This was a standard that was used to connect items such as video game consoles, televisions and stereos. The reason it became so popular is because it was easy. The system took all of those different connections and signals and bought it all down to one signal. Instead of having to try and navigate the several different standards that exist for audio and video, all people had to do was bringing everything together using this system and it all connected simply and quickly. It was almost impossible to make a mistake.

Today, the SCART system still exists because people enjoy the simplicity of it and they also enjoy how it allows them to retain the significant investments they have made in their audio and video equipment. Another reason that people still use this system is because, in some ways, it still offers an extremely superior picture quality than any of the other analogue methods that came along after it. Many of the early DVD players that were sold in Europe were compatible with this system because of the crispness of the picture, regardless of what kind of connection the television had.

As people watched their audio and video components grow, the need for SCART splitters started to grow. Today, there are still plenty of people who use this technology simply because it has withstood the test of time. But as they add DVD players and stereo components to their home theater system, they start to run out of room on their SCART units. These splitters will allow consumers to add more units to their SCART arrangement and expand their home theater set-up without having to get rid of all the equipment they have already invested in.

A SCART splitter can be used to send a signal to two compatible devices simultaneously, but it is important to remember that the output is only from one unit to two units. The one challenge that you will still have to contend with is the inability of some of the signals to be bidirectional. But if you want to retain the investments you have made in your home cinema equipment over the years, then this kind of splitter is the ideal solution. It will allow you to continue to add units to your set-up without having to worry about the new digital conversions or investing in completely new audio or video equipment.



Source by Jason Smythson

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